Whatsoever Magazine

Archive for March 2008

The Resurrection is far-fetched, irrational… and beautifully true.

Poet Kevin Gosa celebrates that in his poem, would it be better?

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So we’re running a day late? The beautiful thing about making up your own rules is that you can change them. And this week’s Writing Wednesday post is coming to you on a Thursday!

Here’s a heads-up to Australian Christian writers under the age of thirty: the 2008 Young Australian Christian Writers Award [.pdf file]. Got a manuscript under 45,000 words that you polish up by the March 31st deadline? Go for it!

And from our archives at the old blog, two resources worth repeating:

“We need to stop talking about what we’re going to do when we grow up. We are up!” -Emily Mortimer in The Kid

Remember being small and sitting around with a bunch of other small people just like you, and talking about how old you are? Did you ever try the old “I’m gonna be nine next year,” line—when you hadn’t even turned eight in the current year yet?

On the first day of 2008, Lauren and I were visiting some precious friends up the coast and we began to talk about how old we’d be “next year”. It was just like being back in primary school, only this time it was actually more threatening than cool to jump forward in age. As another twenty-seven-year-old girlfriend (be proud of your vintage, oh 1980 women!) and I did some calculations, I was thrown into an immediate crisis: I’m going to be twenty-nine next year. Repeat that after me: twenty-nine. Now take six slow, deep breaths and drink a glass of cold water.
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This year has begun with a bang for sure. I feel God is teaching me so much already, and even though He may be speaking to me in a zillion areas of my life, I feel like I’m in the baby stages of learning. Do I have anything to share?

One thing that has suddenly come to mind (the prompting of the Holy Spirit, perhaps?) is a verse God pointed out late in January. I had been thinking about the new year a lot, wondering what it might hold for me. I really had no idea! I had thoughts of minor things I want to achieve personally, but nothing grand, nor anything about what God might have in mind. I wondered what God would teach me, what adventures I’d have, and what changes would be made. I also wondered if I would be faithful to do God’s will. I wrote to some friends while pondering all these things:

This year seems different. My heart feels kind of full of I don’t know what. Happy excitement, expectations, as well as a bit of apprehension maybe? It’s odd. But it’s exciting. I was trying to think of a word to describe how I feel about this year, and one came to mind that I really think fits what I’m feeling—and that is ripe. It’s almost like there are a lot of things building up and now they’re ripe for the picking. And I guess that’s where the apprehension comes in. If something is ripe, then it needs to be harvested. I feel like God is opening up lots of doors of opportunities and lessons (or laying out a field of ripe fruits) and I have to harvest them. I’m kind of nervous that I won’t take the opportunities God has given me. But I’m excited, too. I know that He’ll help me and give me the ability to do His will.

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After an extended Christmas break, Volume 10 #1 should be in the hot little hands of subscribers around Australia and the world. If you haven’t yet received your issue, it’ll be because you’ve recently moved and we’re updating our files for those with new addresses. But your copy will be on its way soon!

Here’s a sneak preview of this issue’s contents:

  • The Road Less Travelled | Chantel Harding chose her path.  But was it the right one?
  • Shining in Small Corners | Abbie Tamme reminds us that he who is faithful in little…
  • Back in the Before, Part 2 | Jemima Aldridge reflects on singleness after a year of marriage.
  • Wonders Without Number | An interview with Abbie Tamme.

You’ll also find your regular favourites in this issue, including book reviews and poetry. To subscribe or order this issue, click here.